Oracle publishes 193 new vulnerabilities in July 2015 CPU

As a company, Onapsis is focused on the security of business-critical applications such as SAP and Oracle. While our focus is on SAP applications, we have been doing research on Oracle business applications as well, identifying and reporting critical vulnerabilities. In this sense, Oracle is different from SAP, specifically with the way and timing that security patches are released and available to end users.

Chinese most likely using one of top three most common SAP exploits, as identified by Onapsis, to compromise US agencies

The Hill publication reported on November 3, 2014 that Chinese hackers roamed around unnoticed for months inside the network of USIS, is the biggest commercial provider of background investigations to the federal U.S. government.[1] In fact, two of the company’s biggest customers were the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).

Oracle Critical Patch Update (CPU April 2015)

As a company, Onapsis is focused on the security of business-critical applications such as SAP and Oracle. While our focus is on SAP applications, we have been doing research on Oracle business applications as well to identify and report critical vulnerabilities. In this sense, Oracle is different from SAP in regards to the method and timing that security patches are released and available to end users.

Building Secure Transactions on SAP Systems

Even though SAP has more than 10,000 standard transactions, all companies create their own custom ones. There are different reasons for building custom transactions. For example, a user might need a specific report, a list, or a functionality that isn't in the system. Sometimes there are even cases where custom transactions with identical functionality of an existing standard transaction are created. Creating custom transactions isn't a problem, it is a normal usage of the system.

SKIP-TLS/FREAK Vulnerabilities and SAP Systems

A few days ago, an important set of bugs that affect the suites of protocols TLS/SSL were published in https://www.smacktls.com/. These protocols are mainly used as the security layer underlying the HTTP(s) protocol, but many other protocols may be affected. The described vulnerabilities have received specific names: SKIP-TLS and FREAK.

IP filtering bypass in SAP Gateway?

Hi! Today I wanted to share some insight on the behavior of SAP Gateway using its ACL files. Particularly, I'll focus on the ACL which restricts direct RFC connections to the Gateway (gw/acl_file). Briefly, this ACL does not replace sec_info or reg_info (they restrict external servers), acl_file controls direct RFC connections from external clients or other SAP Systems, which is actually the most common kind of RFC connection. Check this document describing the ACL syntax.

Using SAP Gateway as a proxy

Hi! In this post I want to summarize you another little-known behavior of SAP Gateway, which is its ability to act as a proxy. Basically when we want to perform an RFC connection two parameters are specified: the IP of the gateway and the IP of the application server. But wait... Is not the gateway always located in the same host than the application server? Yes, usually... but there are some specific cases where you need to use these parameters with different values.

JVM Vulnerabilites and SAP Systems

SAP has its own specific JAVA virtual machine implementation called SAPJVM, which according to SAP documentation: "...is derived from Sun’s HotSpot VM and JDK implementation ... the SAP JVM is only targeting server-side applications. Certain features related to client environments are intentionally omitted or are not supported for general use.".

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